The Lit Asylum

A Reader's Respite. Gone Wild.

wondereads:


Bloomsbury Children’s Books are to reinvent the children’s hardback and paperback editions of the phenomenally successful Harry Potter series. Redesigned inside and out, all seven books will feature covers by award-winning artist Jonny Duddle. Along with the brand new artwork, and an updated author biography, the editions will also be reset to create a child-friendly reading experience for a new generation of readers. The titles will also contain highlights from Pottermore, the digital platform for Harry Potter. All seven titles will be published on 1st September 2014.

Read more here!
wondereads:


Bloomsbury Children’s Books are to reinvent the children’s hardback and paperback editions of the phenomenally successful Harry Potter series. Redesigned inside and out, all seven books will feature covers by award-winning artist Jonny Duddle. Along with the brand new artwork, and an updated author biography, the editions will also be reset to create a child-friendly reading experience for a new generation of readers. The titles will also contain highlights from Pottermore, the digital platform for Harry Potter. All seven titles will be published on 1st September 2014.

Read more here!

wondereads:

Bloomsbury Children’s Books are to reinvent the children’s hardback and paperback editions of the phenomenally successful Harry Potter series. Redesigned inside and out, all seven books will feature covers by award-winning artist Jonny Duddle. Along with the brand new artwork, and an updated author biography, the editions will also be reset to create a child-friendly reading experience for a new generation of readers. The titles will also contain highlights from Pottermore, the digital platform for Harry Potter. All seven titles will be published on 1st September 2014.

Read more here!

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An old love letter from a gentleman to a lady…..courtesy of Brainpickings
An old love letter from a gentleman to a lady…..courtesy of Brainpickings

An old love letter from a gentleman to a lady…..
courtesy of Brainpickings

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One of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s original watercolors for The Little Prince. (courtesy of www.brainpickings.org)
One of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s original watercolors for The Little Prince. (courtesy of www.brainpickings.org)
One of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s original watercolors for The Little Prince. (courtesy of www.brainpickings.org)

One of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s original watercolors for The Little Prince. (courtesy of www.brainpickings.org)

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RIP IX. Readers Imbibing Peril IX begins….. are you in?Stainless Steel Droppings
artwork: Abigail Larson
RIP IX. Readers Imbibing Peril IX begins….. are you in?Stainless Steel Droppings
artwork: Abigail Larson
RIP IX. Readers Imbibing Peril IX begins….. are you in?Stainless Steel Droppings
artwork: Abigail Larson

RIP IX. Readers Imbibing Peril IX begins….. are you in?

Stainless Steel Droppings

artwork: Abigail Larson

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likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”
likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

Comments
Comments